Murray Holladay

Utah’s Hogle Zoo

Located at the mouth of Emigration Canyon, Utah’s Hogle Zoo has nurtured respect and appreciation for animals since its inception in 1931. An accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, the zoo features 42 acres of natural terrain and tree-covered pathways that lead visitors through hundreds of animal species. See our home page.

Exhibits

Located at the mouth of Emigration Canyon since 1931, Utah’s Hogle Zoo is one of SLC’s prize crown jewels. Spread out over 42 acres, the zoo’s natural hillside terrain and meandering tree-covered pathways lead visitors through a variety of wildlife exhibits. These include Rocky Shores, a re-creation of a North American coastal habitat; Asian Highlands, which showcases five endangered Asian cat species; and Elephant Encounter, where the Serengeti meets Salt Lake City.

Famous anthropologist Jane Goodall attended a ribbon-cutting ceremony in 1986 to open the African Savanna exhibit. The zoo has an active conservation program. It breeds animals to increase the genetic diversity of species that are threatened or nearing extinction. For example, Nabu and Baron, the zoo’s lions, were paired by the Species Survival Plan to ensure genetically diverse offspring.

Animals

Utah’s Hogle Zoo has an interesting variety of animals. There are several different animal shows and habitats for the various species. There are also plenty of places for children to climb and play. There is even a splash pad that gets everyone nice and wet on hot summer days.

The zoo has been a leader in developing exhibits that mimic animals’ natural habitats. In addition, the zoo is known for its conservation efforts.

Gorgeous, a female western lowland gorilla at Hogle Zoo, became famous when she underwent cataract surgery in 1985. She was the first gorilla to undergo this procedure, which was performed by a University of Utah ophthalmologist. During the oil spill in Red Butte Canyon, Hogle Zoo took in animals that came into contact with the crude oil. Browse around this site.

Admission

Utah’s Hogle Zoo is located at the mouth of Emigration Canyon and features hundreds of animals. The zoo is a member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and has strict animal care and welfare standards. Guests can visit exhibits like the African Savanna, Rhino Encounter, Great Apes, Small Animal Building, and Rocky Shores. The zoo also features special temporary exhibitions such as the animated dinosaur exhibit Zoorasic Park and conservation-themed art.

During the fall and winter, visitors can save money on admission to the zoo by buying tickets online. Children 2 and under, zoo members, and bus drivers get free admission. During the spring, eligible schools can book field trips for the day through the website. Name tags for students and chaperones are required and must be clearly printed with the group leader’s phone number.

Parking

Utah’s Hogle Zoo, located at the mouth of Emigration Canyon, has been in operation since 1931. One of the city’s top attractions, it is home to more than 800 animals in natural habitats on 42 acres.

In recent years, the zoo has upgraded its exhibits to include more natural settings. Rocky Shores, for example, houses a polar bear, three grizzly bears, seals, and sea lions. African Savanna features giraffes, zebras, and nyalas. Male Amur tigers, leopards, and lynxes live in the Asian Highlands.

Avoid visiting the zoo on the weekend unless you want to deal with crowds and hot weather. Parking is limited, and the main lot fills up quickly. Consider taking public transit, which will also allow you to get some exercise while traveling.

Restaurants

Utah’s Hogle Zoo is a fun, family-friendly attraction. It features over 800 animals in natural habitats. The Zoo is located at the mouth of Emigration Canyon and provides a variety of educational and recreational activities.

A new Entry Plaza opens in April featuring a Wild Zootique gift shop, Membership and Guest Services, and the Zoofari Express train station. The zoo also built a three-acre habitat for cougars with large red cement rocks mimicking the species’ native Utah habitat.

The zoo also began the Species Survival Plan breeding program for Amur leopards by bringing in female Zeya from England to breed with Hogle Zoo’s resident male Dmitri. Amur leopards are one of the world’s most endangered big cat species with only 200 living in zoos in North America. Next article.

 

Driving directions from Accuracy Automotive Service and Repair to Utah’s Hogle Zoo

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